Bar Mitts a Great Alternative to Thick Gloves

Marilyn showed up for a Saturday ride with these ungainly looking bar mits on her handlebars. My hands got cold; for Marilyn, it was her feet. Decide for yourself.–corrie

 

 

Bar Mitts a Great Alternative to Thick Gloves

When temperatures drop below freezing, it can take a mighty thick pair of gloves or mittens to keep your hands warm. Thick hand coverings make it difficult to shift and almost impossible to reach and grasp objects in jersey pockets or your gear bag.

via Issue No. 556: What’s on Tap for 2013 | Road Bike Rider.

Adventure Cycling Association: Winter Tips from a Rain Expert

At better than 15inches, we are nearlly 4 inches over our annual rainfall for the LC Valley. I’ve been caught in more wet weather the last two years than in the previous 10–is the drought over?–Corrie

 

 

Here in the Pacific Northwest, winter means lots of rain. As a native-born Portlander who has been biking seriously since 1999, I think of myself as a bit of a rain expert. Today I’d like to share my field-tested tips on becoming a happy winter cyclist.

via Adventure Cycling Association: Winter Tips from a Rain Expert.

What Cyclists Need to Know About Trucks

I think it is pretty unsafe to pass any line of cars parked at a light, not just big trucks. If you want to be treated as a vehicle, you should act like one. Yes, I know, we get to ride on shoulders and even side-walks, and cities with Bike-boxes actually encouraged cyclists to ride along the ride and move in front of cars stopped at a light. Just doesn’t feel right to me.–Corrie

Trucks have huge blind spots where the driver cannot see the lanes next to and just behind them.  Additionally, when they make a right turn, they typically slow down and swing wide left first, which tempts many cyclists to ride up next to them, right into the path of the rear wheels of the trailer.

via What Cyclists Need to Know About Trucks.

TiGr: Titanium Lock as Cool as your Bike by John Loughlin — Kickstarter

I don’t usually carry a bike lock. But sometimes I want to go into a store or go to a meeting. I hate having to carry my heavy cablelock even though it rides pretty well around the seatpost. I’m not sure I’d like this lock with me at all times, but for those occasions when I know I’ll be away from the bike for some time, this looks like a viable solution.–Corrie

TiGr: Titanium Lock as Cool as your Bike by John Loughlin — Kickstarter.

Bicycle Anatomy for Beginners on Vimeo

We’ve had a quite a few new riders join the club. You don’t have to talk gear inches but it is nice to know the parts of your bike.–corrie

 

Bicycle Anatomy for Beginners on Vimeo on Vimeo

via Bicycle Anatomy for Beginners on Vimeo.

Cycling Without A Helmet? Mon Dieu! | Here & Now

The case against wearing a helmet?

Yes, fear of helmet hair probably does discourage women and maybe men from cycling. the extra hassle of managing a helmet dampens the chief joy of riding a bike–the freedom.

Rosenthal is talking about bike-sharing programs–not sport or recreation cycling. She sees this as akin to walking rather than driving a vehicle.

But it ihese very low speeds that make a bicycle less stable and more likely to go down. The helmet is designed to protect your head from fairly low speed collisions–the kind you might well receive at speeds of 5mph in a crowded urban environment.

We just are not talking about the same thing. We are mostly recreationalr riders, not transportation cyclists, and surely not pedestrians on two-wheels.

I think I’ll keep my helmet- Corrie

 

 

During a recent visit to Paris, New York Times environmental reporter Elisabeth Rosenthal rode a bike from the city’s Velib bike sharing program without a helmet!

And she had an inspiration: bike ridership in the U.S. could increase if people didn’t wear helmets.

via Cycling Without A Helmet? Mon Dieu! | Here & Now.

Top 10 Benefits of Bicycling | kakoluri.com

The other 9 are fine, but here’s my top reason for cycling.–Corrie

Bicycling is fun! Really, this is something that doesn’t get emphasized enough by bicycling advocates trying to address environmental problems. While it’s obvious once you get out there and do it, for many people who haven’t (for transportation purposes), this may not be so obvious.

via Top 10 Benefitsof Bicycling | kakoluri.com.

Doctor’s Orders: Ride Naked (The Best Underwear for Cycling in Regular Duds) | Commute by Bike

Sometimes the spandex just is inappropriate for the venue. And it may not be the coolest way to go. Good piece on heat and some suggested products.–Corrie

In an article I wrote about sweating I mentioned how important it is to “wear the proper clothing on bright, sunny days.” To me, as a backpacker, that has always meant light colored, loose fitting clothing.

via Doctor’s Orders: Ride Naked (The Best Underwear for Cycling in Regular Duds) | Commute by Bike.

Some obstacles in the path of a Seattle bike share system » Biking Bis

I’ve never seen a bike-share operation but it does look like Seattle has some special challenges.–Corrie

First, however, they must overcome some obstacles that make Seattle unique among the dozen or so major North American cities with bike share — namely the terrain, the weather (rainy) and a mandatory helmet law

via Some obstacles in the path of a Seattle bike share system » Biking Bis.

Three Common Bicycling Accidents – and How to Avoid Them | Bike Noob

Always worth reviewing these safety pointers. I’m of two minds about filtering–passing cars on the right which are stopped at a light. I think it is a little like cutting in-line though in cities with bicycle boxes cyclists are encouraged to do just that. Just be extremely alert about passing any one on the right.–Corrie

 

Sharing the road with motorists can be frightening, especially if you live in an area where drivers don’t consider bicycles as legitimate vehicles. I often hear bicyclists say they’d like to incorporate cycling more into their everyday lives, but they just don’t feel safe riding alongside high-speed traffic.

via Three Common Bicycling Accidents – and How to Avoid Them | Bike Noob.

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