Cyclelicious » Strava SNAP: Fix GPS data to track roads

Strava is everywhere these days. Kind of fun to see who’s fastest among friends and certainly another good way to log your miles. I was unaware of the inaccuracy of phone GPS. This first map looks a bit like the old point-and-click maps I made. I didn’t always hit the road with each click making it look like I’d cut off the road to shorten the corner. Now there’s a tool to correct the inefficiencies of phone GPS. –Corrie

 

I use my mobile phone’s GPS to track my bike rides which I then upload to Strava. Unlike purpose built GPS devices, phone GPS can be wildly inaccurate, especially in the steep valleys I often ride through in the Santa Cruz Mountains. The results uploaded to Strava can look like this.

via Cyclelicious » Strava SNAP: Fix GPS data to track roads.

Yoga for Cyclists part 7: Knees | road.cc | Road cycling news, Bike reviews, Commuting, Leisure riding, Sportives and more

I’ve been working with Jen Trost, a physical trainer and cyclist, to strengthen my lower back. This video looks particularly useful and I’ll forward it to Jen. Haven’t looked at the rest of the series of videos but cylcists should find them interesting.–corrie

Yoga for Cyclists part 7: Knees | road.cc | Road cycling news, Bike reviews, Commuting, Leisure riding, Sportives and more.

Riding in a Paceline Is a Basic Cycling Skill | Active.com

The echelon is probably not going to be useful for a handful of riders, but the single paceline gives real advantages into the wind and in pulling along a group. It is easy to go too fast for all the members of the group. The idea is to bring the group in together–not to see who is strongest.

Some good pace line etiquette here–Corrie

Ideally, a group should contain both novices and experienced riders who don’t feel compelled to prove themselves on every ride. The key is riding safely and effectively in a paceline

via Riding in a Paceline Is a Basic Cycling Skill | Active.com.

2 Minutes To 2 Wheels: Teach A Kid To Ride A Bike – BikeHacks

Let your friends with kids read this if they are thinking ab out training wheels.–Corrie

Okay, maybe the headline of this post is a little hyperbolic, but the truth is that my oldest son learned to ride a two wheeler nearly instantly when he was four years old. My boys are currently 6 years old and 3 years old. Next year I’ll teach the little one how to ride a two wheeler the same way I taught his brother.

via 2 Minutes To 2 Wheels: Teach A Kid To Ride A Bike – BikeHacks.

Bicycle Anatomy for Beginners on Vimeo

We’ve had a quite a few new riders join the club. You don’t have to talk gear inches but it is nice to know the parts of your bike.–corrie

 

Bicycle Anatomy for Beginners on Vimeo on Vimeo

via Bicycle Anatomy for Beginners on Vimeo.

Bean Nutrition and Health Benifits for Cyclists | Bicycling Magazine

Beans!–Corrie

If we had to pick a fuel champion for cyclists, beans would be the clear winner. Not only are they versatile, tasty, and easy on the wallet, says sports nutritionist Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, “they provide protein, fiber, minerals, antioxidants, and slow-burning carbs.” In fact, few foods cram so many ride-fueling nutrients into so few calories. Here are five ways beans will improve your riding. —Kelly Bastone

via Bean Nutrition and Health Benifits for Cyclists | Bicycling Magazine.

Deep Breathing helps!

Those thin rapid breaths you are taking are not helping you drink in more oxygen. Try this–Corrie

 

If you’re like most riders, hills are a serious limiter. You do fine on the flats but on steep stuff your lungs scream, especially on group rides where the hotshots force the pace. You gasp for breath and maybe you’re forced to slow down.

via Issue No. 547: Product Review: eoGEAR Top Tube Century Bag | Road Bike Rider.

Cycling Around The World: Crossing the Southwest US Desert | The Province

The crazies took me on a little spring time cycling in Death Valley. I didn’t see any signs like this but we stayed on the pavement. Uh, just in case you want to ride in the desert, take a look at Adventure Cycling’s spring tour schedule.–Corrie

 

There are signs on the trails that say if hike here without water you will die.

via Cycling Around The World: Crossing the Southwest US Desert | The Province.

Adventure Cycling Association: Shifting Technique: Training Intuition

“I’m about to shift down,” I shouted back at Paul who was a bit too close behind me as we hit the steep climb on the 8Lakes ride this year. I wanted to drop to my granny ring in front, but was worried that at the pace we were holding, there’d be too much pressure on the chain to make it happen. And I was right. No granny gear for me. I had to stand and standing meant my pace slowed more than anticipated. Good thing I warned Paul.

Here are some good tips on making those smooth shifts.–Corrie

As we roll in to the waning of the warm, I wanted to take the time to review some basic, but often overlooked, elements of shift/pedal technique.  These tips should help maximize one’s efficiency while minimizing discomfort and mechanical discord.

via Adventure Cycling Association: Shifting Technique: Training Intuition.

Has Strava Ruined the Group Ride?

Paul introduced me to Strava. I’d heard of it only in the context of a cyclist being killed in the act of attempting to recapture the top time for a downhill Strava segment.

Most of the segments I see in our area are for ascending and I get the impression cyclists are going out individually to try for the best time. Our group simply doesn’t ride like that but could Strava infect us? –Corrie

 

Have you noticed your group ride suffering from “Strava Syndrome?” You can tell when you’ve been infected when you start noticing symptoms which include the group’s normal sense of flow and camaraderie being replaced instead by a wacky series of random sprints at every slight crest and city limit sign.

via Has Strava Ruined the Group Ride?.

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